Inyo County Free Library - New Acquisitions

These are books and media new to the library and cataloged by the Inyo County Free Library.

Additional information about each title can be found in the catalog (click on the title). For older acquisition lists choose from Select another list. To request any of these titles please contact your local library branch.

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The structure of scientific revolutions

By Kuhn, Thomas S

Publishing Date: 2012

Classification: 500

Call Number: 501 KUH

A good book may have the power to change the way we see the world, but a great book actually becomes part of our daily consciousness, pervading our thinking to the point that we take it for granted, and we forget how provocative and challenging its ideas once were&;and still are. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions is that kind of book. When it was first published in 1962, it was a landmark event in the history and philosophy of science. Fifty years later, it still has many lessons to teach. With The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Kuhn challenged long-standing linear notions of scientific progress, arguing that transformative ideas don&;t arise from the day-to-day, gradual process of experimentation and data accumulation but that the revolutions in science, those breakthrough moments that disrupt accepted thinking and offer unanticipated ideas, occur outside of &;normal science,&; as he called it. Though Kuhn was writing when physics ruled the sciences, his ideas on how scientific revolutions bring order to the anomalies that amass over time in research experiments are still instructive in our biotech age. - (Chicago Distribution Center)

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Handbook of nature study

By Comstock, Anna Botsford

Publishing Date: 1986, c1967

Classification: 500

Call Number: 508 COM

The late Anna Botsford Comstock was the founder and first head of the Department of Nature Study at Cornell University and the first woman to be appointed to the Cornell faculty. Written originally for elementary school teachers, this book is as valid and helpful today as it was when it was first written in 1911.- (Cornell University Press)

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Natural rivals: John Muir, Gifford Pinchot, and the creation of America's public lands

By Clayton, John

Publishing Date: 2019

Classification: 500

Call Number: 508.0922 CLA

John Muir, the most famous naturalist in American history, protected Yosemite, co-founded the Sierra Club, and is sometimes called the Father of the National Parks. A poor immigrant, self-taught, individualistic, and skeptical of institutions, his idealistic belief in the spiritual benefits of holistic natural systems led him to a philosophy of preserving wilderness unimpaired. Gifford Pinchot founded the U.S. Forest Service and advised his friend Theodore Roosevelt on environmental policy. Raised in wealth, educated in privilege, and interested in how institutions and community can overcome failures in individual virtue, Pinchot's pragmatic belief in professional management led him to a philosophy of sustainably conserving natural resources. When these rivaling perspectives meet, what happens? For decades, the story of their relationship has been told as a split between the conservation and preservation philosophies, sparked by a proposal to dam a remote Yosemite valley called Hetch Hetchy. But a decade before that argument, Muir and Pinchot camped together alongside Montana's jewel-like Lake McDonald in, which was at the heart of a region not yet consecrated as Glacier National Park. At stake in 1896 was the new idea that some landscapes should be collectively, permanently owned by a democratic government. Although many people today think of public lands as an American birthright, their very existence was then in doubt, and dependent on a merger of the talents of these two men. Natural Rivals examines a time of environmental threat and political dysfunction not unlike our own, and reveals the complex dynamic that gave birth to America's rich public lands legacy. - provided by publisher

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The number sense: how the mind creates mathematics

By Dehaene, Stanislas

Publishing Date: c2011

Classification: 500

Call Number: 510.19 DEH

"Our understanding of how the human brain performs mathematical calculations is far from complete, but in recent years there have been many exciting breakthroughs by scientists all over the world. Now, in The Number Sense, Stanislas Dehaene offers a fascinating look at this recent research, in an enlightening exploration of the mathematical mind. Dehaene begins with the eye-opening discovery that animals--including rats, pigeons, raccoons, and chimpanzees--can perform simple mathematical calculations, and that human infants also have a rudimentary number sense. Dehaene suggests that this rudimentary number sense is as basic to the way the brain understands the world as our perception of color or of objects in space, and, like these other abilities, our number sense is wired into the brain. These are but a few of the wealth of fascinating observations contained here. We also discover, for example, that because Chinese names for numbers are so short, Chinese people can remember up to nine or ten digits at a time--English-speaking people can only remember seven. The book also explores the unique abilities of idiot savants and mathematical geniuses, and we meet people whose minute brain lesions render their mathematical ability useless. This new and completely updated edition includes all of the most recent scientific data on how numbers are encoded by single neurons, and which brain areas activate when we perform calculations. Perhaps most important, The Number Sense reaches many provocative conclusions that will intrigue anyone interested in learning, mathematics, or the mind. "A delight." --Ian Stewart, New Scientist "Read The Number Sense for its rich insights into matters as varying as the cuneiform depiction of numbers, why Jean Piaget's theory of stages in infant learning is wrong, and to discover the brain regions involved in the number sense." --The New York Times Book Review "Dehaene weaves the latest technical research into a remarkably lucid and engrossing investigation. Even readers normally indifferent to mathematics will find themselves marveling at the wonder of minds making numbers." --Booklist"--

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That's a possibility: a book about what might happen

By Goldstone, Bruce

Publishing Date: 2013

Classification: 500

Call Number: 519.2 GOL

"With colorful photographs and interactive examples, Bruce Goldstone introduces children to the ideas of something being possible, probable, or impossible. Each spread features an easy-to-understand, fun scenario such as dice rolling and bowling, with questions about probable outcomes and simple explanations. In the vein of GREAT ESTIMATIONS, this is a perfect book for getting across important math concepts in a fun way"--

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Color: a natural history of the palette

By Finlay, Victoria

Publishing Date: 2004

Classification: 500

Call Number: 535.609 FIN

Examining the physical materials that color the world, a freelance journalist explores the social, political, and cultural implications of color throughout history.

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Underland: a deep time journey

By Macfarlane, Robert

Publishing Date: 2019

Classification: 500

Call Number: 551.447 MAC

In Underland, Macfarland delivers his masterpiece: an epic exploration of the Earth's underworlds as they exist in myth, literature, memory, and the land itself. He takes us on an extraordinary journey into our relationship with darkness, burial, and what lies beneath the surface of both place and mind. Traveling through "deep time" - the dizzying expanses of geologic time that stretch away from the present - he moves from the birth of the universe to a post-human future, from the prehistoric art of Norwegian sea caves to the blue depths of the Greenland ice cap, from Bronze Age funeral chambers to the catacomb labyrinth below Paris, and from the underground fungal networks through which trees communicate to a deep-sunk "hiding place" where nuclear waste will be stored for 100,000 years to come.

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100 plants to feed the bees: provide a healthy habitat to help pollinators thrive

By Xerces Society

Publishing Date: [2016]

Classification: 500

Call Number: 571.8642 XER

The international bee crisis is threatening our global food supply, but this user-friendly field guide shows what you can do to help protect our pollinators. The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation offers browsable profiles of 100 common flowers, herbs, shrubs, and trees that attract bees, butterflies, moths, and hummingbirds. The recommendations are simple: sow seeds for some plants--such as basil, rhododendron, and blueberries--and simply don't mow down abundant native species, including aster, goldenrod, and milkweed. 100 Plants to Feed the Bees will empower homeowners, landscapers, apartment dwellers--anyone with a scrap of yard or a window box--to protect our pollinators.

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National Geographic field guide to the birds of North America

Publishing Date: [2017]

Classification: 500

Call Number: 598.097

Presents a guidebook which provides identification tips, information on behavior and nesting, locator and range maps, and plumage and species classification data on over one thousand species of birds found in North America.

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Return of the osprey: a season of flight and wonder

By Gessner, David

Publishing Date: 2001

Classification: 500

Call Number: 598.93 GES

More than any other bird, the osprey symbolizes the New England coast, as Roger Tory Peterson once noted. Known also as fish hawks, ospreys -- with their magnificent six-foot wingspans and dark masks -- are the only raptors to dive fully into the water to catch their prey.

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